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Early intervention for relapse in schizophrenia: impact of cognitive behavioural therapy on negative beliefs about psychosis and self-esteem.

Gumley, Andrew, Karatzias, Thanos, Power, Kevin, Reilly, James, McNay, Lisa and O'Grady, Margaret (2006) Early intervention for relapse in schizophrenia: impact of cognitive behavioural therapy on negative beliefs about psychosis and self-esteem. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 45 (2). pp. 247-260. ISSN 0144 6657

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    Abstract/Description

    Objectives. The study aimed to test two hypotheses. Firstly, that participants who relapsed during the 12-month follow-up period of our randomized controlled trial, would show increased negative beliefs about their illness and reduced self-esteem, in comparison to the non-relapsed participants. Secondly, that cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for early signs of relapse would result in a reduction in negative beliefs about psychosis and an improvement in self-esteem at 12 months. Design and methods. A total of 144 participants with schizophrenia or a related disorder were randomized to receive either treatment as usual (TAU; N = 72) or CBT (N = 72). Participants completed the Personal Beliefs about Illness Questionnaire (PBIQ; Birchwood, Mason, MacMillan, & Healy, 1993) and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES; Rosenberg, 1965) at entry, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months. Results. At 12 months, relapsers showed greater increase in scores for PBIQ entrapment compared with non-relapsers. In addition, after controlling for baseline covariates (treatment group and PBIQ self versus illness), relapsers also showed greater increase in scores for PBIQ self versus illness at 12 months. Furthermore, in comparison to treatment as usual, participants who received CBT showed greater improvement in PBIQ loss and in Rosenberg self-esteem. Conclusions. The study provides evidence that relapse is associated with the development of negative appraisals of entrapment and self-blame (self vs. illness). In addition, this is the first study to show that CBT reduces negative appraisals of loss arising from psychosis and improvements in self-esteem. Implications for future research and treatment are discussed. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

    Item Type: Article
    Print ISSN: 0144 6657
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Relapse; Schizophrenia; Early intervention; Cognitive Behavior therapy; CBT; Psychosis; Self-esteem;
    University Divisions/Research Centres: Faculty of Health, Life & Social Sciences > School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Care
    Dewey Decimal Subjects: 600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health > 615 Pharmacology & therapeutics
    100 Philosophy & psychology > 150 Psychology > 154 Subconscious & altered states
    100 Philosophy & psychology > 150 Psychology > 150 Psychology
    Library of Congress Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
    R Medicine > RM Therapeutics. Pharmacology
    Item ID: 2249
    Depositing User: RAE Import
    Date Deposited: 01 Feb 2008 12:58
    Last Modified: 26 Mar 2013 13:18
    URI: http://researchrepository.napier.ac.uk/id/eprint/2249

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